A light and airy version of a classic

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It was 2009 and I was sitting in the lobby of my London hotel with a friend.

We were waiting for something – I no longer remember what – but while we waited, an array of premium Ben & Jerry’s ice creams stared at us, beckoning us from within phosphorescent glass.

Bored and tempted, we walked towards the humming vending machine. All the flavours were a blur to me – all except one: milk and cookies.

In went the coins and out shot a pot of one of the greatest, most classic flavour combinations around. I didn’t want that tub to end.

For years, my family kept cookies & cream ice cream in the freezer and it was always devoured quicker than any of the other flavours. We don’t buy ice cream much nowadays and I don’t often eat a lot of cookies & cream flavoured things now either – it just sort of disappeared after a while.

It may be this marked absence that explains why this particular flavour combination came to me so strongly when I decided to try out my very first mousse.

I couldn’t find a recipe that gave me what I wanted so I decided to marry two recipes together to create a silky, airy vanilla mousse speckled with chocolate cookies.

Use your favourite chocolate cookie recipe, or here’s how I made mine:

  • 3/4 cup plain flour
  • 1/3 cup cocoa powder
  • 1 cup (113g) unsalted butter, softened
  • 1/2 cup caster sugar
  • 1 large egg
  • 1/2 tsp vanilla extract
  • A pinch of salt

*Sourced from foodnetwork.com. I halved the original recipe and this was enough to make about 12 small to medium sized cookies.

How to:

  1. Preheat oven to 160C.
  2. Cream butter and sugar together until light in colour and fluffy. Beat in egg and incorporate fully, then mix in vanilla extract. *If you’re increasing this recipe to make more cookies, beat in each egg individually.
  3. Sift in the flour, cocoa and salt and mix until just incorporated.
  4. You can refrigerate the dough for about an hour or you can do what I did and just bake it straight away – separate the dough into small balls and squish them gently onto an oven tray lined with baking paper.
  5. Bake for 15 to 20 minutes. Take out of oven and let cool on a rack.

For the mousse, I found a wonderful recipe for vanilla bean mousse on sugarlaws.com and made my own additions and modifications:

I used:

  • The equivalent of 1 vanilla bean from my vanilla bean grinder
  • 1/2 cup caster sugar
  • 2 egg whites
  • 120g creme fraiche

How to:

  1. In a mixing bowl, beat together the creme, vanilla bean and 1/4 cup sugar with electric beaters until the creme forms soft peaks.
    *If this makes any sense, I usually whip cream until the ripples created from the beaters stay in place and look nice and thick, kind of like cake batter.
  2. In a separate bowl, beat the egg whites with electric beaters until soft peaks form. Gradually add 1/4 cup of sugar, tablespoon by tablespoon, while continuing to beat the eggs until thick and glossy.
  3. Crumble 2 or 3 cookies into the cream mixture and fold in. Then fold the egg whites into the cream until everything is just incorporated.
  4. Pour or spoon into serving dishes (I used drinking glasses) and top mousse with crumbled cookies. I used about 2 cookies for each mousse but this will depend on how big you make your cookies and how much you want on top 🙂
  5. Place in fridge for about 6 hours, or overnight.

This makes 3-4 servings. It’s quite a sweet dessert for my taste but it just melts in your mouth and the cookies I made had a bitterness to them, which cut through the sweetness of the mousse really nicely.

The real positive aspect of making this was how much easier it was than I thought it would be. I’ve always hated beating egg whites and my attempts at making things with egg whites – meringue, souffle – haven’t really turned out that amazingly. In comparison, this was pleasantly successful without being stressful, complicated or time-consuming.

Photo: Tao Lin

Photo: Tao Lin

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Stunning student-made cupcake designs

It was hectic at the local technical institute today – students stressing, students crying, students giving their all at the National Secondary Schools Culinary Challenge.

I was there, tip toeing around frantic competitors, dodging plates of food and trying to keep out of everyone’s way, and I was amazed at what the students created in the cupcake icing competition.

These were some of the ones that stood out for me. I’m speaking for myself here when I say that I can’t even imagine creating anything like this now, let alone back when I was 16 or 17. One of the lecturers told me the students attended workshops prior to the competition so they could familiarise themselves with what they had to do and how they could do it. Even so, massive props to these budding young culinary stars for their creativity, preparation and skill.

My personal favourite is the cupcakes-turned-burgers!

Photo: Tao Lin

Photo: Tao Lin

Photo: Tao Lin

Photo: Tao Lin

Photo: Tao Lin

Photo: Tao Lin

Photo: Tao Lin

Photo: Tao Lin

Humble and homemade

There’s a video going around of professor of journalism at UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism Michael Pollan giving a talk about a number of things: the relationship between cooking and health, the changing cultural perceptions and role of cooking over time, the rise of processed foods, our heavy reliance upon food corporations, and McDonald’s french fries.

I don’t find what he argues particularly profound or groundbreaking but I do agree with some of what he says. He argues, among other things, that cooking is the simplest and easiest way to improve health. This is something I’ve come to realise very quickly upon starting on my own cooking adventure because I came to see how much butter actually goes into that chocolate cake and how much salt I end up using to season my food.

Sometimes it’s scary how much fat, salt or sugar I use – and if you’ve followed my blog for a while you’ll notice I’ll always try and lessen the amount of sugar or fat used, especially in desserts – but this makes not being able to see for myself what’s going into my food when I buy takeaways or fast food even scarier.

Pollan points out that corporations cook very differently to individuals. Of course they do. Mass produced food is laden with salt, fat, sugar, additives, preservatives – how else are they going to make it taste good, withstand a long shelf-life and most importantly, make money?

The increased reliance upon processed foods means people are eating stuff that’s not great for them more often. Pollan uses the example of fries. Instead of having to wash, peel, cut and bake/fry potatoes to make fries, you can just buy a frozen bag full of yummy potato and pop it straight into the oven or deep fryer. Less work, less mess to clean up.

I’m absolutely guilty of this, especially with regards to fries. I remember having frozen fries at home from when I was at primary school and only in recent years have I stopped turning to them regularly as a snack or make-do meal when there’s nothing else to eat.

As an aside, some of you may wonder why my parents let me eat those things in the first place and well, I guess they just didn’t think they were that bad. Potato doesn’t feature all that much in Chinese cuisine and I think they figured they didn’t look or taste all that harmful. They were easy to rustle up and I loved them.

Once I discovered how delicious hand-cut, oven-baked potato fries and wedges could be though, I found it harder and harder to pull out that greasy bag of McCain chunky cut chips from the freezer.

Admittedly, it does take more work and more cleaning up but it’s infinitely more satisfactory. Peel ’em or don’t, cut ’em anyway you want, fry ’em or bake ’em, season with your own herbs and spices, serve with a main meal or have ’em on their own.

They’re yours for the taking.

Photo: Tao Lin

Potato wedges and kumara (sweet potato) tossed with olive oil, salt and pepper, baked at 200C non-fan bake for around 40 to 50 minutes, until soft. Photo: Tao Lin